Peacemaking in Class Warfare

THIS PIECE WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED in three parts (Part I, Part ii, part iii) BY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY’S BERKLEY CENTER FOR RELIGION, PEACE & WORLD AFFAIRS AS PART OF THEIR MILLENNIAL VALUES PROJECT, FOR WHICH I WAS SELECTED AS A MILLENNIAL VALUES FELLOW IN 2012.

Heard of “Rich Kids of Instagram”? It’s a Tumblr account recently featured in an article from the New York Times about how some New Yorkers—in a city with higher unemployment rates than Atlanta, Boston, Houston, or Chicago—can hardly afford to buy groceries. The author of the article compared these struggling city-dwellers with the stars of “Rich Kids of Instagram,” which recently went viral.

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Teaching America to Talk

THIS PIECE WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED BY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY’S BERKLEY CENTER FOR RELIGION, PEACE & WORLD AFFAIRS AS PART OF THEIR MILLENNIAL VALUES PROJECT, FOR WHICH I WAS SELECTED AS A MILLENNIAL VALUES FELLOW IN 2012.

One of my friends at Boston University has a dream. It might not sound quite as inspirational as world peace or ending starvation in Africa, but it is important. He wants our country to rediscover the ability to have civil conversation. He told me about his plan one afternoon, his idea to organize a huge event—”our generation’s Woodstock,” he called it—centered on making dialogue happen.

But that’s just talking, people might say. Just words. Is there any real value in that?

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The Millennial Generation

This piece was originally published by Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs as part of their Millennial Values Project, for which I was selected as a Millennial Values Fellow in 2012.

My high school environmental science teacher, a reformed hippie who had gone from Woodstock attendee to educator, often told us, “We were the generation who said we were going to change the world. You are the generation who is actually going to do it.”
Granted, she was only thinking along the lines of building solar panels and perfecting electric car (and getting in touch with nature, which she had us do by going on wilderness rambles through the woods around our school, resulting in muddy jeans and many disgruntled high school seniors). But that phrase of hers moved me in ways her lectures didn’t–the idea that our generation, the Millennial Generation, was different. A promise for the future. Something real.

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